How to Fight the Fear of Flying

No matter how much time I spend in the air I am anxious for the majority of the flight. It’s a ridiculous fear for someone who spends at least fives hours on a plane every four weeks. According to the app for my most used airline I have flown one and a half times around the world. But despite my abundance of air miles I spend a large part of every journey panicking. Perhaps my anxiety of being in an airplane is justified and something I can never completely conquer. However, I am starting to gather tips after each experience in order to make the next journey slightly more enjoyable. Hopefully you have some too and will leave them in the comments below.

 

Some Do’s

  • Chewing gum throughout the flight is essential for me. Not only does it help with alleviating the pain of air pressure but gum also keeps your mouth occupied. This stops you nervously breathing large gulps of air, which is unpleasant for the person sitting next to you but also seems to make you panic more. Slower breaths through the nose release tension at a more steady rate whilst giving you a minty smile. As long as you aren’t a loud chewer gum is a winner for everybody.
  • Whenever I fly it’s important to choose an airline I trust. Statistically air-travel is the safest mode of transport but a phobia isn’t a rational creature. If you know that an airline has had a recent accident then the it’s best to avoid them. Even though lighting rarely strikes the same place twice you’ll still be thinking about the worst throughout the journey.
  • I’ve found that it’s worth paying a little extra for a flight instead of opting for the budget option. The main reason for this is simply breathing space. Budget airlines have limited room in order to their maximise profit and offer you a better deal. The down side to their lower prices is that you’re often cramped into a considerably smaller space. If your body is bunched up then it’s impossible to relax your mind. If you’re going to fly budget then I would recommend the aisle seat. You may get bashed more by the air staff but you will have a little more room and shouldn’t have to fight for the arm rest- an essential to grab during turbulence.

 

Some Don’ts

  • Although a playlist of whale songs may sounds harmonious I wouldn’t advise listening to music in flight. When your ears are occupied then every muffled announcement becomes a minor panic. Something as simple as being asked to fasten seat belts or the starting of the drinks service can make you anxious when you miss it. Without all your senses the mind immediately races to an emergency landing in the Pacific ocean. To avoid this I’d recommend reading a book or if you are going to download some movies get the subtitled version and only use one headphone.
  • It goes without saying the alcohol and coffee should be avoided in the air. Caffeine will only increase your heart rate leading to further panic and alcohol amplifies the feeling. It’s best to stick to water and if you need the bathroom then go straight away. I always feel like I am going to get pulled down the plane toilet when it flushes but at least I will have an empty bladder when it happens.
  •  A lot of people sleep during their flights but it’s something I don’t do anymore. There’s nothing more frightening than being in the middle of a dream and being shaken awake when the plane takes a turbulence dip. If you’re on a long haul flight then I would avoid naps and wait until you are tired enough to sleep for a long time. That way you will probably fall back to sleep as soon as the panic is settled.

 

 

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How not to Irritate at the Airport

Airports should probably be labelled with a public health warning because of the stress they induce. They’re crowded with a mass of people all seeking different locations in different languages. The result is a swarm of chaos filled with swinging suitcases and screaming children. Every day the news doesn’t report on a riot at an airport is a surprise. Somehow the chaos succeeds and safely transports people to every country on the globe. However, the triumph can only last so long. The law of averages dictates that someday this system must fall apart. I think we can delay this though. By lessening our irritating traveling traits perhaps airports can remain brawl free a little longer.

 

The Golden Rule of Waiting in Line

In every airport there are two vital queues. Firstly, there is the baggage check line, followed by the wait to board the plane. How you behave in these social structures determines your fellow travelers perception of you. The golden rule for any queue is space. Waiting in lines is understandably irritating but feeling someone else’s breath on your ear is worse. You have to provide the person in front of you with enough room to drop something and bend down to retrieve it, without feeling obliged to buy them dinner afterwards.  Shortening each other’s personal space doesn’t make the process any quicker. After all, we are all boarding the same plane or waiting for the individual who forgot to take their laptop out of their carry-on bag. A little consideration for each other’s breathing space makes for a much smoother wait.

 

The People Getting the 16:35 Flight to Shanghai

If there was an award for the most appalling passengers it would go to these people. Approximately twelve individuals whose collective failures managed to be irritating in every part of the airport. Beginning at baggage check we have two young men and a lady. The trio’s biggest accomplishment was taking eighteen minuets to be scanned and collect their luggage. They achieved this through their desire to keep all personal belongings in their pockets, refusing the separate the liquids from their luggage and hiding hair straighteners and laptops under their clothes. Their collective efforts were an effective tester of airport security and proved just how safe air travel can be.

Once the Shanghai destined party were safely ushered through baggage check they descended into duty free shopping. It was relief to other passengers to see them browsing discount chocolate and reduced price alcohol. Avoiding their crowd I headed to the long passport control line. The relief was short lived as all twelve party members came rushing with their new purchases, attempting to push to the front of the queue. Only one individual offered an explanation for their behaviour. Essentially, they had been shopping so long that they forgot their flight was departing in ten minutes. Armed with discounts they managed to push to the front of a line every body had been waiting in for nearly half an hour. Their collaborative irking deserves a lifetime ban from air travel. To achieve this I have appealed to several UN bodies but have received no response.  The next logical step seems to be crowdfunding. My goal is to gather enough cash to only send these people on cruises.

Conserve your Carry on

The price for extra baggage is excessive. It’s no wonder people attempt to cram excess carry-on luggage onto the plane.  Flight staff rarely check the amount of cargo people are trying to smuggle onto the aircraft. Most of the time they are too busy or it’s not worth the hassle of engaging a cranky traveler who is over eager to complain.  The result of this lack of regulation is a serious lack of space. People are scrambling to stuff their slightly too large cases into the over head compartment, willing to crush everybody else’s belongings in the process.  When the compartments are opened upon landing several suitcases descend on people’s head. On average four passengers are removed from the aircraft on stretchers for immediate medical attention. In order to reduce airplane injuries we should attempt to only take an appropriate amount of luggage and remember that your family’s coats can under the seat, instead of taking up valuable storage space.